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Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer

  • Motorcycles
  •  | 
A Collector finds a Piece of History built by a Racing legend
Words by Kurt Diserio — Photos by Alexa Diserio
Before we get to the bike, let’s rewind to 1959. That’s the year motorcycle legend, Eddie Mulder, won his first race at the age of fifteen. Since then, “Fast Eddie” went on to have a career brimming with success, joining the Triumph factory racing team and racking up wins and track records in everything from dirt track, hare scrambles, hill climbs, and more. The bikes he built have put in laps throughout the hills and deserts of California and Mexico to the top of Pikes Peak in Colorado. And that’s just the short version of his racing career.
Not long after retiring, Eddie Mulder got involved in the entertainment industry as an actor and stuntman. Do you remember the motorcycle escape scene in Clint Eastwood’s Magnum Force? Those were Mulder’s first stunts.
Even with over two dozen movies and numerous television commercials and music videos to his credit, Mulder never lost sight of his true passion for racing. He continues to build bikes and stay involved with the sport by running a flat track racing series at the world-famous Willow Springs International Raceway in Rosamond, California.
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
Every bike that Mulder built carried a slice of this history, and when one of his dirt track racers popped up for sale online, local car and motorcycle collector, Greg Sinnamond, jumped on the opportunity. With an impressive collection made up of race cars, highly optioned specialty cars, and classic motorcycles, Sinnamond has an appreciation for the grit and dedication of vintage motorsports. With little changed from its days of sliding around dirt tracks in Southern California, the 1969 Triumph 750 you see here embodies the true spirit of racing. We talked with Sinnamond about why he’s drawn to old Triumphs, how he came about this bike, and what it means to him.
You have a history of collecting bikes. How did this Triumph 750 come about?
Greg Sinnamond: I found it when scouring a vintage flat tracker website. I had an idea of what I was looking for, so when this Triumph came up, I knew it was the one. The bike became available, I contacted the guy, and that’s how it all came into play. He gave me the bike’s history, and I thought it was really cool that it was built by Eddie Mulder, a factory Triumph racer from the 1960s and 70s.

It was originally a 650cc engine that was upgraded to 750cc with different heads to be competitive against the Harley XR750s in its class. The previous owner used to race it at the Walt James Dirt Track at Willow Springs. The track’s decomposed granite surface was both extremely fast and tough on paint.
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
I see a lot of Triumphs here, is there a reason you’re attracted to that brand specifically?
GS: Quick, funny story. When I bought this land, I went in front of the local board in hopes of getting help on an issue related to the property, and there was a guy there that used to work at Homestead Mills. He saw my name and asked if my Uncle John used to work there. After I confirmed, he agreed to help me out because my uncle was the only guy working at the mill that treated him appropriately during his time as a junior. He also mentioned that my uncle used to ride a Triumph to work every single day, even in the winter.

These motorcycles were always there when I was growing up. I remember my dad and my uncles having Triumphs around more than Harleys, and I suppose I’ve always gravitated towards the look of these more. Don’t get me wrong, I really like the Harley XR750 flat trackers, but there was something about the Triumphs that really appealed to me.
What do you like most about the bike?
GS: Almost just as important as the bike itself is the history behind it. Everything from the appearance to the way it was raced. For instance, the controls were switched from one side to the other in order to lay it over at high speeds. I like that not much was changed on the bike from those days. Even on the cars I collect, for some reason, I’m drawn to things with a history to them. In comparison to your typical restoration, I prefer that they have a story and some soul.
,br> The fact that it came out of Eddie Mulder’s shop in Southern California was something special. I really dig the orange and grey paint, the straight headers, and the sincerity of it. Eddie truly cares about the sport of racing and took pride in his bike builds.
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
In comparison to its racing days, what all has changed on the bike?
GS: I was given a few of the stock parts when I bought it, but this is almost exactly how it was raced. There were just a couple of small adjustments to make it street legal. A new battery, a headlight, and a push-button horn is all it took to get over the line of being able to ride it on the road legally. That was it.
The stripped-down form of a motorcycle is something that both racers and many chopper enthusiasts have in common. What do you feel ultimately sets this bike apart from other modern builds?
GS: Sometimes with today’s bikes, it’s just too much. This is in its simplest form with a number of handmade parts and pieces that you just can’t buy.

Typically with race bikes, they’re thrashed, covered in stickers, or just put together well enough to finish the race—with very little thought put into the aesthetics. I feel this one has more class than the typical flat track racer build.
As a collector, is there a preference or something specific that you’re looking for in a motorcycle?
GS: Ultimately, I want to ride them. I enjoy all types of bikes, so that’s important. For instance, one of my favorite motorcycles is my everyday rider, a 2007 BMW R 1200 GS. I also have a 1972 Guzzi 850 and other vintage models with some modern technology upgrades. It’s all over the place.

In addition to the race bikes, I have some old Corvette race cars from the 1960s and 70. I’ve always been intrigued by the ones with a bit of a heartbeat. There’s a beauty to that. When you go out and take a drive in one of those cars or a ride on a bike with as much character as this Triumph, it’s more meaningful and gives you a different feel when riding. You know it’s been on the track and ridden with purpose.
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
Greg Sinnamond talks Triumphs with Kurt Diserio.
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
Triumph 750 Dirt Track Racer Eddie Mulder Pittsburgh Moto
  • Featured in Issue 10
  • 1969 TRIUMPH 750 DIRT TRACK RACER
  • Owned by GREG SINNAMOND
  • Built by EDDIE MULDER
  • Words by KURT DISERIO
  • Photos by ALEXA DISERIO
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